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Do you plan to offer a camera for microscopes?

Martin Laurence
asked this on January 23, 2012 06:50 AM

I'm doing research using light microscopes. Will your technology also apply to microscopes? Making images like the one attached is both time consuming and incomplete. Your camera could do miracles in this field.

 

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adam gould
Lytro Staff
Check Answer

Hi Marin!  While this would clearly be an exciting application of lightfield photography,  we are entirely focused on the consumer camera market at this time:

http://support.lytro.com/entries/20631662-i-have-an-idea-for-a-comm...

Hope you understand, and we hope to see a much wider range of application in the years to come.

 

 

January 23, 2012 02:20 PM
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Shannan Mortimer

What prevents using an adapter to point the lytro consumer model being pointed down a microscope tube? Can one of your team have a go? I would love to see the results.

June 26, 2012 09:04 PM
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Chris Waddling

I'm a researcher at UCSF and would love to offer our stereomicroscopes to help you guys develop an adapter for this purpose. 

July 10, 2012 02:09 PM
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Ben Vianay

Hi,


I am also a researcher (cell biophyiscs at EPFL - Swiss)  and I would be really interested to use the Lytro camera for fluorescence microscopy. Even if you do not plan to develop camera for this issue, I would be rgeatful if some ingeneer or technician of your staff can contact me to discuss about basics on the light field sensor and engine and maybe exchange preliminary idea/solution to mount your camera on a fluo microscope.

 

Thank you in advance

 

B. Vianay

 

August 06, 2012 04:40 AM
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Ian Ellison
Lytro Staff

Hi folks,

Thanks for all the great ideas and encouragement.

However, as Adam noted, right now we're focused on this first Lytro Light Field Camera, which is squarely aimed at sharing living pictures online with friends and family.  While you're all more than welcome to explore what's possible at the margins with this version of the technology right now, it's only fair to caution you that the results will most likely fall short of optimum. Therefore we're holding back on partnerships of this kind until or unless something that is more likely to justify your investment of time becomes possible:
http://support.lytro.com/entries/20631662-i-have-an-idea-for-a-comm...

Thanks again for your enthusiasm, and for those of you who decide to plunge on into the unknown anyway-- good luck and fair sailing ahead! 

August 31, 2012 07:52 PM
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adam gould
Lytro Staff

Just a quick update here...

In terms of our camera working with a microscope, the image-side f-number is highly mismatched between cameras and microscopes.

For those interested in lightfield microscopy, our CEO Ren and our VP of Engineering Kurt recommended the following paper for more technical detail if you'd like http://graphics.stanford.edu/projects/lfmicroscope/

October 11, 2012 05:59 PM
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Peter Lee
Light Field Explorer

Why not forget the microscope objective in favour of a reverse mounted 35mm camera lens?  Gives much better results : )

 

Mole Cricket Leg

{lytro]https://pictures.lytro.com/pleecan/pictures/402978[lytro]

 

Peter Lee

October 12, 2012 02:16 AM
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Peter Lee
Light Field Explorer

Why not forget the microscope objective in favour of a reverse mounted 35mm camera lens?  Gives much better results : )

 

Mole Cricket Leg

[lytro]https://pictures.lytro.com/pleecan/pictures/402978[lytro]

 

Peter Lee

October 12, 2012 02:16 AM
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Richard Gordon

Since Lytro won't get involved for now, may I suggest that we exchange e-mail addressee so we may correspond directly with one another? Mine is DickGordonCan@gmail.com and I'm after time lapse of the surface of 2mm diameter spherical early stage axolotl embryos.

October 12, 2012 04:27 AM
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adam gould
Lytro Staff

@Peter Wow!  This is really impressive.  May I ask how you mounted the 35mm lens to the camera?  Duct tape?  >;-)

October 12, 2012 11:21 AM
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Peter Lee
Light Field Explorer

Hi Adam:

A custom made copy stand with 2 arms, one for supporting the camera and one arm for supporting the  reverse mounted lens , then optically align.  Image was taken with a remote mechnical shutter release.   Specimen sits a movable stage in the z axis that has  micrometer movements for fine focus.

PL

October 12, 2012 11:33 AM
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Peter Lee
Light Field Explorer
October 12, 2012 11:42 AM
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Peter Lee
Light Field Explorer

An image of feathers taken through 10X Apochromatic Microscope Lens positioned infront of the Lytro camera:

https://pictures.lytro.com/pleecan/pictures/366025#./366025?&_suid=213

October 12, 2012 11:45 AM
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Peter Lee
Light Field Explorer

Hi Dick: The biggest problem when taking time lapse is that this Lytro camera lacks a proper shutter release.  You need to fabricate one or wait till Lytro issues hardware/software fix.  Next problem is power: embryo development takes time , the camera will run out of power or memory storage before the job is done.  When in charging mode you will not be able to take pictures.   The next question is  the factory lens is incapable of  imaging 2mm object up close ... you need an augmented lens system. Lytro does not allow interchangeable lens. ... the lens in the Lytro is not designed for macro work... I know first hand.   In my opinion, there are easier methods out there with conventional DSLR tethered to a pc  with Live Image and remote computer control, to be blunt ... I would not waste my time on the Lytro unit for imaging 2mm embryos  at 10 sec interval.   Ultimately the images from a Lytro needs to be converted to a form that publishers can recognize... that would b a jpg.  The JPG is only about 1 million pixels  compared to 14 million Pixel on Sony Nex 5 camera that I use.   For details in imaging biologic morphologies in real time... a conventional  digital camera is a most prudent choice in investment of time, money and energy.

PL

October 12, 2012 03:42 PM
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Peter Lee
Light Field Explorer

I am now able to image with Lytro through a microscope via a special transfer lens (undisclosed configuration) but it works.  (Took 4 months and over $1000 to figure out)....

Bee Head: 4x objective 

Microscope Image of Honey Bee Head: https://pictures.lytro.com/pleecan/pictures/534647#_=_

January 27, 2013 05:56 AM